Italy is a versatile wine country. In terms of the difference in microclimate and soil types, Italy is not inferior to France. In addition, Italy has native grape varieties that make great wines. The diversity of grapes, soil types and climates are enormous. Italy has a different structure as a wine country. In fact, viticulture can be found in all regions and quality wines are also produced throughout the country. Classic wines are of course Barolo, Chianti, Valpolicella and Brunello di Montalcino. Highly recommended for a taste. In addition, the grapes are very interesting and different than in other countries. The Sangiovese, Nebbiolo and Nero d’Avola, for example, are genuine Italian grapes that you hardly find in other countries.

Abruzzo

Abruzzo is an Italian wine region that is not very well known. She owes her fame to the Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, a pleasant red wine from the Montepulciano grape. Most white from Abruzzo is made from

Alto Adige

Alto Adige or Süd-Tirol belonged to Austria until the First World War. You can tell by everything. German is still spoken, and wine is made from “Austrian grapes” such as Weissburgunder, Blauburger,

Amarone della Valpolicella

The Amarone della Valpolicella has an impeccable reputation. The special thing about this wine is that the grapes are dried for a minimum of 4 months after the harvest.

Barbera d’Alba

Around the town of Alba in Piedmont there are several DOCs where very good wines are made. One of these areas is Barbera d’Alba. From the name we can immediately derive that the wines 

Barbera d’Asti

The Barbera d’Asti wine comes from the area around the city of Asti. Five varieties of this wine are produced in this area, each with its own rules, namely the (ordinary) Barbera d ’Asti, Barbera d’ Asti Superiore and three sub-variants 

Barolo

Barolo wine is without a doubt the best appellation in Italy. The best Barolo wine perfectly expresses the elegance of the nebbiolo. The best vineyards are sometimes on steep slopes and are surrounded by the hills of the Langhe.

Bolgheri

Bolgheri is a wine village in Tuscany where red, white and rosé wines are made. A large variety of grapes has been planted around the village. Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc have been planted for the red wines.

Calabria

Calabria is an unknown and small wine region in the south of Italy. The region is poor and is not yet able to make wine that becomes more widely known. The vineyards are on hot and steep mountain slopes. In itself it should succeed

Langhe

De Langhe, together with the Monferrato and the Roero, forms the heart of Piedmont. It is the most important area of origin of the culinary tradition of Piedmont, the world famous Piedmontese cuisine. The famous Piedmontese white truffle (Tuber magnatum)

Lugana

The Lugana wine region should not be confused with Lake Lugano. The region is in fact located at another famous water: Lake Garda. The Doc Lugana is located exactly south of the Garda Lake and belongs to the larger and versatile Lombardy wine region.

Monferrato

The Monferrato is a large area that, together with the Langhe and the Roero, forms the heart of Piedmont. It consists of the province of Asti and one part of Alessandria, but the last city is no longer within the Monferrato; the most important city is therefore Asti.

Passito

The Italian name for naturally sweet wine, made from dried grapes, is passito. The grapes are dried on mats or by hanging the bunches. Due to the loss of moisture, the grapes get so many sugars that only a part of them ferment; the rest gives the wine a lush sweet taste.

Piedmont

Piedmont is considered the best wine region in Italy. Of course, Italy has more good wine regions but from this region come wines that are among the best in the world. The big names Barolo, Barbaresco and Moscato d’Asti come from this region.

Roero

The Roero is one of the most important wine regions of Piedmont. Very beautiful white and red wines are made from it. The area is characterized by the sandy soils where besides grapes also a lot of vegetables and fruit is grown. The white wines are made from Arneis

Umbria

Umbria (or Umbria) has a long history of wine production. The Etruscans have already made wine in this relatively small region. Various archaeological finds in this region have supported this. Later the wines were also appreciated by the Romans and the Popes.

Valpolicella wines

Valpolicella has been a famous wine region since Roman times. In the DOC Valpolicella, four different types of wine can be made from corvina grapes, molinara grapes, and rondinella grapes. In order from light to heavier wines these are: Valpolicella, Valpolicella Superiore,

Valtellina

The Valtellina wine region is in Lombardy, north-east of the famous Lake Como. The Valtellina valley is protected by the Alps against the cool north wind. The vineyards are located at an altitude of 300-700 m. They are planted on terraces because the slopes of the Alps are steep, some even as high as 70%.